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from NAMI.org
Smoking and Mental Health: Why Is It Harder for People with Mental Illness to Quit Smoking? Examining research about effective strategies for people living with mental illness who want to quit smoking.
2015 Health Insurance Open Enrollment Starts Nov. 15
The Center for Health Care Services: Focusing on Person-Centered Treatment
The Jim Effect
-more at NAMI.org-
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NAMI Johnson County, KS.
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NAMI Johnson County, KS. 
Support Group/Educational Meetings
 
 
First Tuesday of every month: Program/educational meeting

 

Second and Fourth Tuesday of every month: Support groups for consumers, family members and their caring friends.


Time: 7:00 pm

Location:


Nall Avenue Church of the Nazarene
6301 Nall Ave.
Prairie Villlage, KS 66202-4321

For more information, call 913-210-0630 or e-mail us at drkenmorris@namijcks.org

 
To find locations and times as well as current events, please call (913) 210-0630
 
 
 
Johns Hopkins Health Alert
Do You Need a PAD?
 

 

In many health emergencies, such as heart attacks and strokes, doctors make all the decisions. The same is often true of mental health crises as well. But if you have a psychiatric condition that could lead to hospitalization -- such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or severe depression -- you may have strong feelings about various treatment options. This is when a psychiatric advance directive (PAD) can be just what the patient ordered.

 

A psychiatric advance directive is a legal document that clearly states your wishes for treatment of a mental health disorder. It acts in the same way a general healthcare directive declares your preferences or a living will spells out your choices about end-of-life care.

 

Not everyone with a mental health issue needs to draw up an psychiatric advance directive. For example, people with mild anxiety or depression or seasonal affective disorder probably do not need to worry about being hospitalized for these conditions. But if you’ve been admitted to a hospital for a psychiatric illness in the past or if your doctor feels that you may at some point lose the ability to make rational decisions -- even temporarily -- a psychiatric advance directive may be worthwhile.

 

A psychiatric advance directive must be filled out while you are competent and healthy. Usually you must have it signed by two witnesses and notarized. Currently, 25 states have statutes supporting the use of psychiatric advance directives specifically, and all 50 states have laws supporting the use of living wills or other health-care directives.

 

If you live in a state that hasn't yet addressed psychiatric advance directives, you can usually attach an additional form to the standard healthcare directive. To get the correct information (and a form to fill out), visit the National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives and click on "State by State Info": www.nrc-pad.org.

 
 

Who Is NAMI?

 

NAMI is the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the nation's largest grassroots organization for
people with mental illness and their families. Founded in 1979, NAMI has affiliates in every state
and in more than 1,100 local communities across the country.

 
What Is the NAMI Mission?
NAMI is dedicated to the eradication of mental illness and to improving the quality of life for
persons of all ages who are affected by mental illnesses.
 
What Does NAMI Do?
NAMI members and friends work to fulfill our mission by providing support, education, and
advocacy. Our many activities include:
 
Public Information
NAMI Johnson County, KS. web site (www.namijcks.org), or call 913-210-0630
NAMI's national website (www.nami.org) receives over 5.4 million visitors a year who turn to NAMI for
information, referral and education.

 
NAMI's Helpline (1-800-950-6264) is staffed by a dedicated team and serves over 4,000 callers
per month.

 
Peer Education and Support
NAMI Educational Programs (Family to Family, Peer to Peer, NAMI Connection, Hearts and Minds, and more) provide critical education to help consumers and family members gain
knowledge and skills for living successfully with mental illness.

 
Support Groups are provided through many of NAMI's state and local affiliates and offer
invaluable connections with peers who understand the challenges and joys of living with mental
illness.

 
The American Institute of Philanthropy congratulates NAMI on its A-Grading."
Daniel Borochoff, President, AIP, www.charitywatch.org
 
 
Raising Awareness and Fighting Stigma
NAMIWalks is a signature NAMI event that draws thousands of concerned citizens every year who
walk together in over sixty communities across the nation to raise money and awareness about
mental illness.

 
StigmaBusters responds to inaccurate and hurtful language and portrayals of mental illness in the
media and promotes understanding and respect for those who live with mental illness.

 
In Our Own Voice presents deeply personal and moving journeys of recovery by consumers
living with mental illness.

 
State and Federal Advocacy
NAMI Advocacy provides a key voice for state and federal public and private-sector policies that
facilitate research, end discrimination, reduce barriers to successful life in the community and
promote timely, comprehensive and effective mental health services and supports.

 
NAMI Action Centers include the Child & Adolescent Action Center, the Law and Criminal
Justice Action Center, the Multicultural Action Center, and the STAR (Consumer Support and
Technical Assistance Resource) Center. NAMI's Action Centers advocate for unique populations
and develop and disseminate information to meet specific needs.
 
 

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