Mental Illnesses Treatment Support & Programs NAMI Advocacy Find Your Local NAMI NAMIWalks
Search
 | Print this page | 
 | 
Teens_and_Young_Adults

Restoring Intimacy: The Patient's Guide to Maintaining Relationships During Depression

By Drew Pinsky, M.D.; Anita Clayton, M.D.; David Dunner, M.D.; Robert Hirschfeld, M.D.; Thomas Wise, M.D.; Martha Manning, Ph.D.; and Laura Epstein Rosen, Ph.D.

Review by Barbara Pilvin, Judith Patterson, and Dick Greer, NAMI Literature Committee

Restoring Intimacy: The Patient's Guide to Maintaining Relationships During Depression by Drew Pinsky, M.D.; Anita Clayton, M.D.; David Dunner, M.D.; Robert Hirschfeld, M.D.; Thomas Wise, M.D.; Martha Manning, Ph.D.; and Laura Epstein Rosen, Ph.D.
(The National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association, 1999. 126 pages. Paperback: $12.95)

Organized in a handy question-and-answer format, Restoring Intimacy: The Patient's Guide to Maintaining Relationships During Depression, by Drew Pinsky, M.D., et al., is divided into five chapters on diagnosing depression; treating depression; relationship issues; getting appropriate help; and resources, such as self-tests, an annotated list of organizations and their Web sites, and a list of medications. This is certainly one of the first books, perhaps the first, to deal directly and frankly with the impact of affective disorders on sex, marriage, and family relationships. Among the problems addressed here are the sexual side effects of some antidepressants and the ways in which the symptoms of depression in men differ from those in women.

Five of the seven contributors-Pinsky, Anita Clayton, David Dunner, Robert Hirschfeld, and Thomas Wise-are psychiatrists, and two, Martha Manning and Laura Epstein Rosen, are psychologists. All are trained and experienced in the treatment of people with affective disorders and relationship problems, and their expertise is clear in their straightforward, compassionate answers to the questions of consumers and family members. Manning is also a wife and mother who has been treated for depression, a fact that makes her comments particularly helpful.

The book's five-part structure is helpful, but the sequence of questions in the chapters isn't always logical. And the list of medications does not mention any mood stabilizer other than lithium, an inexcusable omission in so recent a book in which bipolar disorder is discussed.

Although this book is somewhat expensive, the NAMI Literature Committee recommends that NAMI affiliates purchase it for their libraries and suggest it to public and professional libraries because there is so little information about these problems of mental illness and intimacy.


 | Print this page | 
 | 

Donate

Support NAMI to help millions of Americans who face mental illness every day.

Donate today

Speak Out

Inspire others with your message of hope. Show others they are not alone.

Share your story

Get Involved

Become an advocate. Register on NAMI.org to keep up with NAMI news and events.

Join NAMI Today
  • Follow NAMI
  • Contact Us
    • NAMI
    • 3803 N. Fairfax Dr., Suite 100
    • Arlington, Va 22203
    • Main: (703) 524-7600
    • Fax: (703) 524-9094
    • Member Services: (888) 999-6264
    • Helpline: (800) 950-6264