NAMI - National Alliance on Mental Illness Home | About NAMI | Contact Us | En Espanol  | Donate  
Find
  Advanced Search  
 

Sign In
myNAMI
Communities
Register and Join
Donate
What's New
State & Local NAMIs
Advocate Magazine
NAMI Newsroom
NAMI Store
NAMIWALKS
National Convention
Special Needs Estate Planning
NAMI Travel

  Special Needs Estate Planning
 Shared Interests
  Consumers
  Teens and Young Adults
  NAMI on Campus
  Families
  Daughters and Sons
  Veterans
  Criminal Justice
  Faith Community
  GLBT Consumers and Supporters

Print this page
Graphic Site
Log Out
 | Print this page | 
 | 
Daughters_and_Sons

New Study: NAMI Family Education "Significantly" Improves Coping with Mental Illness

June 14, 2011

Arlington, VA -- NAMI's Family-to-Family Education program "significantly" improves coping and problem-solving abilities of family members of individuals living with mental illness, according to a landmark study published in the current issue of Psychiatric Services, a journal of the American Psychiatric Association.

Family-to-Family is a free 12-week self-help course offered by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in which trained instructors who have family members living with mental illness teach coping and supportive skills to other persons with family members diagnosed with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or other conditions.

Led by Lisa B. Dixon, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the study found that the NAMI classes increase both knowledge about mental illness and "empowerment within the family, the service system and the community."

NAMI's Family-to-Family program offers "concrete practical benefits" and demonstrates the value of free, community-based self-help programs as a "complement" to professional mental health services, the study noted. The classes combine an instructional curriculum with a support group environment.

"NAMI has long had confidence in Family-to-Family as a signature education program," said NAMI Executive Director Michael J. Fitzpatrick. "The study reinforces the position of family advocates. It is a signal to the medical profession."

"Doctors and other mental health care workers are often unable to provide enough support to family members, even though families often play a critical role in the treatment and recovery of loved ones."

The study coincides with the 20th anniversary of NAMI's Family-to-Family program. An estimated 250,000 family members have taken the classes to date.

Over 3,500 trained volunteers teach classes in the United States and Puerto Rico. In some communities, classes are offered to families of veterans through local Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities.

Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the study evaluated the effectiveness of classes in five counties in the culturally diverse Greater Washington, D.C. and Baltimore area, involving 318 participants recruited between 2006 and 2009.

The study will be presented at NAMI's annual convention in Chicago, July 2-9, 2011.

About NAMI

NAMI is the nation's largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness. NAMI has over 1,100 state and local affiliates engaged in research, education, support and advocacy.

NAMI on Twitter
NAMI on Facebook


 | Print this page | 
 | 

Donate

Support NAMI to help millions of Americans who face mental illness every day.

Donate today

Speak Out

Inspire others with your message of hope. Show others they are not alone.

Share your story

Get Involved

Become an advocate. Register on NAMI.org to keep up with NAMI news and events.

Join NAMI Today
Home  |  myNAMI  |  About NAMI  |  Contact Us  |  Jobs  |  SiteMap

Copyright © 1996 - 2011 NAMI. All Rights Reserved.