Ask the Doctor: Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Mar. 01, 2014

Being the parent of an adolescent child can be difficult, but it can be even harder when your child lives with a mental health condition. Luckily dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), has been adapted to strengthen the relationship between parents and children living with mental health conditions by focusing on changing certain behaviors and reinforcing the idea of acceptance to the therapy.

Parents and children engage in individual skill-building sessions and then joint sessions where they practice using these skills to communicate more effectively. These skill-building sessions include learning the following:

  • Mindfulness: learning to be in the present and to pay attention without judgment and respond in effective and strategic ways.
  • Interpersonal effectiveness: finding ways to get your needs met without compromising yourself.
  • Emotion regulation: understanding why we have emotions and how to live with intense emotions.
  • Distress tolerance: coping with intense feelings effectively without harming yourself.
  • Middle path: validating each other’s thoughts and feelings.

These skills are practiced in the presence of a therapist so that when emotional situations develop in the real world, adolescents and their parents are able to effectively restructure the situation to a more positive one.

Being the parent of an adolescent child can be difficult, but it can be even harder when your child lives with a mental health condition. Luckily dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), has been adapted to strengthen the relationship between parents and children living with mental health conditions by focusing on changing certain behaviors and reinforcing the idea of acceptance to the therapy.

Parents and children engage in individual skill-building sessions and then joint sessions where they practice using these skills to communicate more effectively. These skill-building sessions include learning the following:

  • Mindfulness: learning to be in the present and to pay attention without judgment and respond in effective and strategic ways.
  • Interpersonal effectiveness: finding ways to get your needs met without compromising yourself.
  • Emotion regulation: understanding why we have emotions and how to live with intense emotions.
  • Distress tolerance: coping with intense feelings effectively without harming yourself.
  • Middle path: validating each other’s thoughts and feelings.

These skills are practiced in the presence of a therapist so that when emotional situations develop in the real world, adolescents and their parents are able to effectively restructure the situation to a more positive one.

- See more at: https://www.nami.org/About-NAMI/NAMI-News/Adapting-DBT-for-Children#sthash.ZEmd5TWH.dpuf

Being the parent of an adolescent child can be difficult, but it can be even harder when your child lives with a mental health condition. Luckily dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), has been adapted to strengthen the relationship between parents and children living with mental health conditions by focusing on changing certain behaviors and reinforcing the idea of acceptance to the therapy.

Parents and children engage in individual skill-building sessions and then joint sessions where they practice using these skills to communicate more effectively. These skill-building sessions include learning the following:

  • Mindfulness: learning to be in the present and to pay attention without judgment and respond in effective and strategic ways.
  • Interpersonal effectiveness: finding ways to get your needs met without compromising yourself.
  • Emotion regulation: understanding why we have emotions and how to live with intense emotions.
  • Distress tolerance: coping with intense feelings effectively without harming yourself.
  • Middle path: validating each other’s thoughts and feelings.

These skills are practiced in the presence of a therapist so that when emotional situations develop in the real world, adolescents and their parents are able to effectively restructure the situation to a more positive one.

- See more at: https://www.nami.org/About-NAMI/NAMI-News/Adapting-DBT-for-Children#sthash.ZEmd5TWH.dpuf

Being the parent of an adolescent child can be difficult, but it can be even harder when your child lives with a mental health condition. Luckily dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), has been adapted to strengthen the relationship between parents and children living with mental health conditions by focusing on changing certain behaviors and reinforcing the idea of acceptance to the therapy.

Parents and children engage in individual skill-building sessions and then joint sessions where they practice using these skills to communicate more effectively. These skill-building sessions include learning the following:

  • Mindfulness: learning to be in the present and to pay attention without judgment and respond in effective and strategic ways.
  • Interpersonal effectiveness: finding ways to get your needs met without compromising yourself.
  • Emotion regulation: understanding why we have emotions and how to live with intense emotions.
  • Distress tolerance: coping with intense feelings effectively without harming yourself.
  • Middle path: validating each other’s thoughts and feelings.

These skills are practiced in the presence of a therapist so that when emotional situations develop in the real world, adolescents and their parents are able to effectively restructure the situation to a more positive one.

- See more at: https://www.nami.org/About-NAMI/NAMI-News/Adapting-DBT-for-Children#sthash.ZEmd5TWH.dpuf
Comments
Pam Sinnett
Helpful explanations
12/10/2016 2:52:07 PM

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