In The News

Cuomo calls on mental health professionals to volunteer during pandemic — so far, 6,175 have
Posted on Mar 25 2020
CBS News
NAMI mentioned

During his daily press briefing on COVID-19 in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo took a moment to focus on an often-forgotten aspect of the pandemic: mental health. Cuomo announced that 6,175 mental health professionals have signed up to provide free online mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic. "This is increased anxiety for everyone," said Dr. Ken Duckworth, chief medical officer of NAMI.

'You're not alone': How to find mental health resources during a global pandemic [pick-up by Yahoo News]
Posted on Mar 25 2020
Today.com
NAMI mentioned

Every day the news sounds overwhelming. And staying at home might worsen symptoms of loneliness or depression. “People want to get support during this very tumultuous time,” Dr. Ken Duckworth, chief medical officer at NAMI told TODAY. “Everybody is vulnerable to (COVID-19). There's no population that is immune to this. It’s important to keep in mind that we're all in this together and you're not alone.”

Dr. Duckworth provides advice for coping with COVID-19
Posted on Mar 24 2020
BBC World News
NAMI mentioned

Dr. Ken Duckworth, chief medical officer, provides an on-air interview for the BBC World News London evening edition on coping with physical distancing and social isolation due to COVID-19.

Anxiety and depression likely to spike among Americans as coronavirus pandemic spreads
Posted on Mar 23 2020
ABC News
NAMI mentioned

Mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are likely to spike among Americans in the coming weeks because of the uncertainty created by the pandemic. Experts, however, are particularly worried about people who are predisposed to depression and anxiety. NAMI recommends maintaining a sense of normality and routine that mirrors life’s daily patterns and practices.

Is there a right way to worry about coronavirus? And other mental health tips
Posted on Mar 19 2020
The Guardian
NAMI mentioned

In the face of indefinite isolation, contagion, financial uncertainty, and with no return to normality in sight, coronavirus is taking its toll on our collective mental health. “If you’re losing sleep over what’s happening or you’re unable to concentrate on anything other than the risk...you should probably consider [lowering] your dose of media to once a day,” says Dr. Ken Duckworth, medical director of NAMI. Exercise and helping others may also give you a happiness boost and sense of purpose. 

"This is going to compound your problems": Coronavirus poses new challenge for many with mental illness
Posted on Mar 16 2020
CBS News
NAMI mentioned

An estimated 1 in 5 people in the U.S. suffer from mental illness, and 1 in 25 from severe mental illness, according to NAMI. "If you already have an anxiety disorder...or unstable housing, or you're already isolated, this is going to compound your problems," said Dr. Ken Duckworth, medical director of NAMI. "Even though we are distancing ourselves physically, we should not be distancing ourselves socially...this collective crisis should bring people together in spirit and support if not in proximity," Katherine Ponte, NAMI-NYC board member said.

The mental health cost of containing the coronavirus outbreak
Posted on Mar 13 2020
The Hill: Changing America
NAMI mentioned

"We have seen an uptick [in calls to the NAMI hotline] and we’re beginning to track the calls related to COVID-19," Dawn Brown said. One caller was grieving a loved one who died of the disease in Japan, while another reported thoughts of suicide over concerns they would lose their job. Some callers have unstable housing or are homeless, while others are smokers, a group that is at a high risk for COVID-19. “We’ll weather this,” Brown said. “Strength and resilience is what will get us through.”

8 Easy, Not-Stressful Things You Can Do Right Now to Feel Better
Posted on Mar 13 2020
Cosmopolitan
NAMI mentioned

The coronavirus pandemic is anxiety-inducing and this article provides tips to navigate the associated stress. Hopefully you are able to hunker down at home for the next couple weeks and practice "social distancing" to limit the spread of COVID-19. But canceling plans and hanging at your apartment can be lonely and just plain weird. While you're working from home, "a routine that mirrors the office life's daily patterns and practices can be helpful," according to Katrina Gay, National Director of Strategic Partnerships at NAMI.

It's not a hotline, it's a 'warmline': It gives mental health help before a crisis heats up
Posted on Dec 04 2019
USA Today
NAMI mentioned
Unlike a hotline for those in immediate crisis, warmlines provide early intervention with emotional support that can prevent a crisis – and a more costly 911 call or ER visit. The lines are typically free, confidential peer-support services staffed by volunteers or paid employees who have experienced mental health conditions themselves. "It's unimaginable, hard to conceptualize, for those who don't work in this field, what the level of need really is," said Quinn Anderson, who manages the NAMI HelpLine.
Mental Health Coverage Continues to Fall Short, Study Shows
Posted on Nov 20 2019
Bloomberg
NAMI mentioned
More Americans turn to out-of-network providers when seeking mental health care than when seeking medical care, and the trend continues to worsen, a new study shows, despite a law designed to prevent this problem for people seeking treatment for conditions such as depression and addiction. “This report shows that Americans continue to face barriers to mental health care perpetuated by insurance companies, such as red tape and lack of in-network providers,” says Angela Kimball, acting CEO. “The current situation is putting lives at risk.”